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02
03 06 10 14 18
04 08 12 16
Dates & Months of the Year
White Sunday
Easter
Chinese New Year
Queens Birthday
Commonly Used Signs
ANZAC Day
Waitangi Day
Matariki
18 22 26 30
20 24 28 32
Guy Fawkes Night
Diwali
Boxing Day
Labour Day
Christmas
Halloween
New Year’s Eve / Day
Eid al-Fitr
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 15
First
20 25
When signing the date of a special event the signs for numbers are used.
For numbers 11 - 19, the
sign is moved up and
down, twice, in front of the
body.
For numbers above 20, the
numbers are made side by side
with the hand moving to show
the second digit.
For the 1st - 9th of every
month, the numbers are
signed facing away from
the body then turned.
January
May
September
February
June
October
March
July
November
April
August
December
Dates & Months of the Year
02
Below are the signs used when describing many of New Zealand’s public holidays and special events.
They have been placed at the front of this book rather than repeated throughout.
activity
Deaf
New Zealand
holiday
sports
celebrate/festival
people
lolly/sweet
tradition
culture
game
public
month
weekend
day
gift/present
religion/religious
new
year
02
Commonly Used Signs
03
Chinese New Year, also known as Lunar New Year or
Spring Festival, is the most important of the traditional
Chinese holidays.
The festival begins on the rst day of the rst month
in the Chinese calendar and ends with the Lantern
festival on the fteenth day. Chinese New Year falls on
dierent dates each year, butusually a date between
21st January and the 20th February.Chinese New
Year is celebrated in countries which have a large
Chinese population. It is not an ocial holiday in
New Zealand but larger cities, like Auckland, have
Lantern Festivals to celebrate.
In Chinese culture, each new year relates to
an animal. They use a 12 year cycle. The 12
animals in order are the rat, ox (or cow),
tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse,
sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and pig
(or boar).
GLOSSARY
a festival (noun) = a celebration
ocial (adjective) = approved, proper, recognised
a population (noun) = the number of people who live in a place or area
a superstition (noun) = a belief (not based on fact) that something will happen
e.g If you break a mirror you will have 7 years bad luck
to symbolise (verb) = to represent, stand for
a tradition (noun) = a customary way of doing something, custom
Chinese New Year has many traditions and
superstitions. Many people travel to visit and
celebrate with their families.
People often wear new clothes to symbolise a new
beginning in the new year. Red is the main colour
seen in clothing and decorations as it is believed to
scare away evil spirits and bad luck. Red envelopes or
packets with money inside are given to young people
or the elderly. The amount of money inside should be
an even number as odd numbers are given during
funerals.
The number 8 is considered lucky so packets often
have $8 inside. Dragon and Lion dances are common
in Chinese New Year celebrations. The face of the
Dragon or Lion, as well as the loud drumming and
crashing cymbals, are believed to scare away bad or
evil spirits. The koi sh is often seen in paintings and
seen as a decoration on food. This symbolises success.
JAN 21 - FEB 20
Chinese New Year
04
12
lantern
red
cycle
ox/cow
symbol/symbolise
animal
money
rooster
demonstration/display
pig
tiger
boar
monkey
sheep
dog
population
China/Chinese clothing
music ofcial
snake fs - superstition
dragon horse
rabbit rat
04
Chinese New Year
05
GLOSSARY
the British Empire (noun) = a group of countries that were ruled by Great Britain e.g.
Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India
a British Governor (noun) = the person who made sure people followed the laws and
rules of Great Britain
British Settlers (noun) = people who left Great Britain to live in New Zealand
to commemorate (verb) = to honour and remember
to found (verb) = to set up, begin, establish
protocol (tikanga) (noun) = behaviours, rules, guidelines
a representative (noun) = a person who works on behalf of a group of people
a treaty (noun) = an agreement, a contract
Waitangi Day is a public holiday which celebrates
the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand’s
founding document. The Treaty of Waitangi was
signed on the 6th February 1840 on the grounds of
James Busby’s house in Waitangi in the Bay of Islands.
James Busby was the British Resident of New Zealand
and his job was to make sure British settlers could buy
and sell things in New Zealand. He also tried to make
peace between the British settlers and the Māori.
The Treaty established a British Governor in New
Zealand and made New Zealand a part of the British
Empire. It made sure Māori could own their land and
gave Māori the same rights as the British people. The
Treaty was signed by representatives from Britain and
over 500 Māori Chiefs from tribes in the north of the
North Island.
The Treaty is short and has only three parts.
Unfortunately the English and Māori translations dier
and this has made it dicult to understand exactly
what was promised. The two cultures have dierent
understandings of words such as property or ‘taonga’
(treasures) and this has led to arguments about who
really owns some of the land, for example the seabed and
foreshore. Waitangi Day was ocially commemorated in
1934 and it has been a public holiday since 1974. People
in New Zealand celebrate the public holiday in a variety
of dierent ways. Public concerts and festivals are held on
this day and some marae have open days giving the public a
chance to experience Māori culture and protocol (tikanga).
FEB 06
Waitangi Day
06
1840
Governor
sell
culture
property
argument
ground/land
signing/signed
Empire
protocol/tikanga
British
language
treasures/taonga
experience
representative
buy commemorate
Māori peace
Treaty of Waitangi tribe
foreshore found/set-up
rights seabed
06
Waitangi Day
07

GLOSSARY
articial (adjective) = fake, not real
a Christian (noun) = a person who believes in Jesus Christ
crucixion (noun) = death after being nailed to a cross
to dye (verb) = to use a colour mixture
a litter (noun) = a family group of animal babies
Northern Hemisphere (noun) = the top half of the Earth,
from the equator to the North Pole
rebirth (noun) = to be born again
to resurrect (verb) = to come back to life after being dead, revive, awaken
a treat (noun) = a special thing, sweet, gift
In New Zealand Easter weekend is a public holiday.
Originally Easter was known as Eostre and was a
pagan festival that celebrates Spring. It is now a religious
festival. Christians believe Jesus was resurrected from
the dead on the third day after his crucixion. Some Christians
celebrate this resurrection on Easter Day or Easter Sunday (also known
as Resurrection Day or Resurrection Sunday), two days after Good Friday.
In the Northern Hemisphere, Easter occurs during Spring. At this time of year
birds lay their eggs and rabbits have large litters. Eggs are a symbol of rebirth
and used by Christians as a symbol of the resurrection of Jesus. One Easter
tradition is to use dyed or painted chicken eggs, but a modern custom is to use
chocolate eggs, or plastic eggs lled with lollies such as jelly beans. These eggs
are often hidden on the Saturday, by the Easter Bunny, for children to nd on
Easter morning. Otherwise, they can be put in a basket lled with real or articial
straw to look like a bird’s nest.
Hot cross buns (spiced buns with a white cross on top) are another treat enjoyed
over Easter. Traditionally hot cross buns are eaten on Good Friday as the cross
symbolises the Crucixion of Jesus Christ.
MAR 22 - APR 25
Easter
08
after
egg
straw
Christian
litter/group
articial
nd
symbol
crucixion
look for
Autumn
Good Friday
treat
dye
rebirth
bunny/rabbit chocolate
hot cross bun Jesus Christ
Easter Easter Monday
resurrect Spring
08
Easter
09
GLOSSARY
bloodshed (noun) = killing, ghting
a Corps (noun) = a group of people who work together
courageously (adverb) = bravely
to evacuate (verb) = to be taken away from danger to another place
great (adjective) = large, big, huge
to land (verb) = to come down upon something
a poppy (noun) = a type of red ower
a service (noun) = a formal meeting or ceremony e.g. a church service
ANZAC Day is a day for remembering the people who fought and
died in wars. The rst ANZAC Day was held on 25 April 1916. ANZAC
stands for Australia and New Zealand Army Corps.
World War One or the Great War was fought between England and
Germany from 1914 to 1919. Many other countries also fought in this war,
Australia and New Zealand were two of the countries who fought to help
England win. Turkey wanted Germany to win.
On 25 April 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers (servicemen)
were taken in ships to the tiny beach at Gallipoli Cove, in Turkey. It
was the rst time that Australian and New Zealand soldiers had
fought together. These soldiers were called the Australian
New Zealand Army Corps or ANZACs for short.
ANZAC Day remembers the landing of the ANZACS at
Gallipoli. Many ANZACs lost their lives. The Turkish Army was
high up on the clis and could easily shoot many of the ANZACs
down on the beach. The ANZACs fought courageously and after
eight months the ANZACs, who were still alive, were evacuated
to safety.
On 25 April every year, services are held to commemorate the
ANZACs and other soldiers who have died in wars. People wear
red poppies to show their respect for the soldiers. Red poppies
grew in the elds of Flanders, in France where there was
a lot of ghting during World War One. Red is also a
symbol of bloodshed.
APR 25
ANZAC Day
10
1916
die
red
bloodshed
France
world
fs– ANZAC
England
remember
cliff
fs - Gallipoli
army/soldier
evacuate/exit
respect
fs - Corps
Germany
Australia beach
eld fs - Flanders
war
country courageous/brave
great poppies
10
ANZAC Day
11
GLOSSARY
appropriate (adjective) = suitable, correct
to be awarded (verb) = to be given a
prize or a reward
to coincide (verb) = to happen at the
same time
a monarch (noun) = the person who
rules a country e.g. King or Queen
to occur (verb) = to happen, take place
a proposal (noun) = a suggestion, idea
public (adjective) = general, community
to serve (verb) = to do things for others, to help others
The Queens Birthday is a public holiday celebrated in
Commonwealth countries (countries which were formerly part of
the British Empire). When appropriate the word Queen is replaced with
King to become King’s Birthday.
The date is dierent in each country and doesn’t usually fall on the exact
birthday of the Queen or King. The current monarch, Queen Elizabeth II was
born on 21 April 1926.
In New Zealand Queens Birthday occurs during Winter and usually coincides with
the opening weekend of the ski season. In London, England it is Summer and
they have a special parade called Trooping the Colour to celebrate the Queens
birthday.
In New Zealand there are no public displays of celebration on Queens
Birthday however the Queens Birthday Honours list is
announced on this day. The New Zealander’s on this list
are awarded with New Zealand Orders of Merit or
Queens Service medals for service to
the community.
There have been proposals in New
Zealand to replace Queens Birthday
with Matariki. Matariki is the Maori
New Year and occurs around the same
time every year as Queens Birthday.
JUNE 1ST MON
Queen’s Birthday
12
announce
medal
community
appropriate
King/Queen/Monarch
Commonwealth
replace
award
occur
England
service
birthday coincide
parade proposal
honour
Summer Winter
12
Queen’ s Birthday
13
GLOSSARY
a cluster (noun) = a group of things close together
a crop (noun) = food grown and gathered
conservation (noun) = looking after, protecting
to be cultivated (verb) = to be grown and worked on
guardianship (noun) = responsibility, caring for
a harvest (noun) = gathering of crops e.g. picking fruits and vegetables ready to eat
horizon (noun) = the line between the earth and sky
traditional (adjective) = the way things were done in the past
unique (adjective) = only one, special
a whanau (noun) = an extented family
Matariki is the Māori name for a
group of stars also known as the
Pleiades star cluster or Seven Sisters.
It is also known as the traditional
Māori New Year. The rst rising of the star
cluster can be seen in the last few days of May every year in the north-
east horizon. Māori New Year celebrations occur at the next new moon,
which happens in June.
Traditionally Matariki was a time to celebrate and prepare the
ground for the following year’s harvest. If the stars were
brighter this meant a warm season and therefore a
larger crop.
Matariki was an important time for whānau to get
together, reect on the past and look forward to the future. Oerings
of food were given to the Gods, including Rongo (the God of cultivated
food like kūmara). Matariki was a good time to teach the young about
conservation and guardianship of the land and forest.
Now people celebrate Matariki by having festivals and
concerts, art displays, tree plantings, workshops, theatre, kapa
haka, sports days and exhibitions. Matariki is a special time for New
Zealanders to come together, share and celebrate our unique Māori heritage
and culture.
The Ruamoko marae at Kelston Deaf Education
Centre (KDEC) was built in 1992. The KDEC
Maori Tutor teaches students
about the traditions of
Matariki.
LATE MAY - JUNE NEW MOON
Matariki
14
art
horizon
food/kai
moon
sister
kūmara
ground
prepare
stars
cluster
Māori
guardianship
Rūaumoko/earthquake
unique
conservation cultivate
marae Matariki
harvest/crop heritage
seven
Whānau
share
14
Matariki
15
White Sunday is a holiday in Samoa. It is also
celebrated in other Pacic countries such as Tonga
and the Cook Islands. It is a day which celebrates children
and childhood. In the Samoan language White Sunday is called
“Lotu Tamaiti” which means Childrens Sunday.
On White Sunday special church services are held. Children perform in front of
parents, family and friends. They recite verses from the Bible, sing hymns and perform
plays which they have practiced and memorised. Children also receive gifts (often new
clothing and/or school supplies) on White Sunday and are allowed privileges normally given
to elders, such as being the rst to be served food at family meal time.
White is the most important colour in any church in Samoa. Women and children wear white
clothing on White Sunday. Men wear white shirts with lavalavas. Sometimes people trim their
white clothes with the two other colours of the Samoan ag, red and blue.
GLOSSARY
elders (noun) = people who are older
lavalavas (noun) = the main item of clothing worn by men and women in Samoa
to memorise (verb) = to commit to memory, remember, learn by heart
a privilege (noun) = a special right or benet enjoyed only by certain people
to recite (verb) = to read something out loud
to trim (verb) = to decorate around the edge
OCTOBER - 2ND SUNDAY
White Sunday
16
bible
privilege
ag
blue
red
meal
clothing
Samoa
memory
children family
Sunday white
performance prayer
16
White Sunday
17
GLOSSARY
Anniversary (noun) =
the annual celebration of
a special event e.g. wedding
anniversary
a carpenter (noun) = a person who
builds or repairs things made from
wood
conditions (noun) = the way things are
a demonstration (noun) = when a group of
people march or stand together to show that they
disagree with or support something or someone
to encourage (verb) = to help, support, inspire, motivate
others
recreation (noun) = relaxing, spending your time on activities
you enjoy
terms (noun) = conditions, rules
Labour Day
occurs all
around the
world. Most
countries
celebrate on the
1st May and it is
known as May Day and
International Workers Day.
Labour Day celebrates better
working conditions for men,
woman and children. In New Zealand
it is celebrated as a public holiday on the
fourth Monday in October.
In 1840, Samuel Parnell, a carpenter, left
London and came to live in Wellington, New
Zealand On the ship he met a man who asked him
to build him a store. Mr. Parnell agreed but he said: We have
twenty-four hours per day given us; eight of these should be for
work, eight for sleep, and the remaining eight for recreation and in
which for men to do what little things they want for themselves. I am
ready to start to-morrow morning at eight oclock, but it must be on
these terms or none at all”.
Samuel Parnell also encouraged others who came to New
Zealand to only work for 8 hours a day. In October 1840, a workers
meeting was held supporting this idea. On October 28, 1890, a
parade was held to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the
Eight-Hour Day. This was then celebrated every year either as
Labour Day or Eight-Hour Demonstration Day
and in 1899 it became a public
holiday.
Every year during
Labour Weekend, the New Zealand
Deaf Games (NZDG) are held. The NZGD started
in 1949 and is an important event to the Deaf Community.
People meet friends, old and new, and compete in sports such
as Badminton, Basketball, Indoor Bowls, Darts, Netball, Indoor
Netball, Golf, Ten Pin Bowling, Touch, Lawn Bowls and Eight Ball
Pool. Three Zones (Northern, Central, Southern) compete in these
sports to try and win the Aotearoa Turi Shield.
OCTOBER - 2ND SUNDAY
Labour Day
18
1840
international
zones
working conditions
shield
anniversary
Northern
demonstration
terms
carpenter
London
eight
twenty four
Central community
sleep Southern
encourage hour
Wellington work
18
Labour Day
19
1840
international
zones
working conditions
shield
anniversary
Northern
demonstration
terms
carpenter
London
eight
twenty four
Central community
sleep Southern
encourage hour
Wellington work
18
Labour Day
19
MID OCTOBER -
MID NOVEMBER
Diwali is a ve-day festival and an ocial holiday in India, Sri Lanka, Singapore,
Malaysia and Fiji. It is known as the ‘Festival of Light’ and celebrates the
beginning of the Hindu New Year. Diwali is a time to remember the traditional
story of Prince Ram and his wife Sita who were banished from their home.
Sita was later abducted by a demon king then rescued by her husband Ram.
They returned after fourteen years and people guided them home by lighting
lamps called diva. This story symbolises the victory of good over evil, light
over darkness.
Traditions vary in dierent countries but people usually light divas to remember
this story. They also make special rangoli patterns with coloured powder. These
patterns are placed at the front door to welcome visitors and Lakshmi, the
goddess of health and prosperity, to their homes in the hope that she will
bring good luck for the year.
During Diwali people also wear new clothes, visit a Hindu temple and make
sweets. These sweets are given to family and friends. At night people light
reworks.
The fourth day of the festival is ‘New Years Day. The last day is called ‘BhauBeej’
and it is a special day for brothers
and sisters.
GLOSSARY
to be abducted (verb) = to be stolen or taken away
to be banished (verb) = to be sent away from a place
a diva (noun) = a small clay lamp
a goddess (noun) = a female god
to guide (verb) = to lead, show the way
Hindu (adjective) = follows the religion Hinduism
prosperity (noun) = wealth, good fortune
to rescue (verb) = to save someone or something
from a dangerous or unpleasant situation
to symbolise (verb) = to represent, stand for, explain
a victory (noun) = a win, a success over an enemy
Diwali
20
abduct
Hindu
story
diva
prosperity
banish
India
temple
demon/evil
religious
brother
King
victory
goddess
rescue
colourclothes
lights luck
good guide
sister special
20
Diwali
21
GLOSSARY
Ancient Celtics (noun) = people who lived in Scotland, Ireland, Wales and parts of Europe over
two thousand years ago
to carve (verb) = to cut carefully with a sharp blade
disguised (adjective) = look like someone or something else, unrecognisable
harmful (adjective) = unsafe, will hurt others, damaging
haunted (adjective) = visited by spirits
mischief (noun) = trouble, naughtiness
rotten (adjective) = not fresh, bad-smelling, gone o
a spirit (noun) = a ghost, a person after they have died
Halloween takes place every year on 31 October. It is very popular in the
United States of America and Canada. People dress up in costumes, go trick-or-
treating, carve Jack O’Lanterns, watch scary movies, visit haunted houses and have
bonres and Halloween parties.
It was believed by the Ancient Celtics that the border between our world and the Otherworld
is
thin on this night of the year, allowing spirits to travel through. By wearing costumes and masks,
people disguised themselves as a harmful spirit making sure they were not hurt by the real
harmful spirits who came through from the Otherworld.
Jack O-Lanterns are made from pumpkins. The top is cut o and the seeds and esh are taken
out of the inside, leaving the outer skin. A scary face is carved into the outer skin of the pumpkin,
then a candle is placed inside. The Jack O’Lantern is then placed in front of the house to scare
away harmful spirits.
Trick-or-treating is an activity that children like to do at Halloween. They dress up in their
favourite costume, walk from house to house, knock on the front door and ask the people inside
Trick or treat?” A ‘trick means to play a joke or perform mischief on the house or property. For
example, the children will throw rotten eggs or put toilet paper on trees. If the children are given
lollies, chocolate or money as a ‘treat’ they will not play a ‘trick.
OCTOBER 31
Halloween
22
activity
harmful
spirit
carve
party
Ancient
haunted
treat
fs– Celtic
popular
America
joke
trick
costume
pumpkin
bonre Canada
mask mischief
disguised Halloween
rotten scary
22
Halloween
23
GLOSSARY
annual (adjective) = happens once a year
anonymous (adjective) = unknown e.g. do not know who wrote the letter
to arrest (verb) = to capture a person by legal authority and keep in custody
to assassinate (verb) = to kill an important person
to be executed (verb) = to be killed for breaking the law
a failure (noun) = not successful
Guy Fawkes Night (also known as Bonre Night)
is held every year to celebrate the failure of
the Gunpowder Plot of 5th November 1605.
The Gunpowder Plot was a plan to assassinate
King James 1, a Protestant, and restore
Catholicism, a dierent religion, in England. A
group of thirteen Catholic men attempted to blow
up the House of Parliament by placing a large
amount of gunpowder in a storage room underneath
the House of Lords. The men thought this would be the
perfect place for it as the storage room hadn’t been used
for a long time.
On Saturday 26th October 1605 a Catholic Lord received an anonymous
letter warning him not to attend Parliament. This letter was shown to the
King on Friday 1st November and he ordered a
search of the Houses of Parliament on Monday 4th November. Just after
midnight the search party found Guy Fawkes, one of the plotters, near
a pile of rewood in the storage room. Fawkes was searched and placed
under arrest. He was carrying matches and hidden underneath the rewood
were the barrels of gunpowder. Fawkes was sent to the Tower of London where
he was tortured. On 7th November he admitted he had not acted alone, there were
other men involved. All of the plotters were executed.
On 5th November 1605 people who lived in London were encouraged to celebrate the King’s
lucky escape from assassination by lighting bonres. This became an annual celebration and
reworks were used with bonres from 1650. In New Zealand we celebrate Guy Fawkes night on
the 5th November and the weekend closest to it. The larger cities have public reworks displays
and reworks can also be purchased by people over the age of 18 to light at home in
their backyard.
Parliament (noun) = a meeting of people who make decisions about
their country
a plotter (noun) = a person who plans to do something
to purchase (verb) = to buy
to restore (verb) = to bring back
tortured (adjective) = made to suer, hurt by others
NOVEMBER 5
Guy Fawkes Night
24
17th Century
execute/hang
restore
barrel
kill/assassinate
annual
failure
search
blow up
King
anonymous
re
tortured
bonre
Parliament
arrest attempt
reworks/Guy Fawkes
jail
Tower of London
Catholic encourage
plot Protestant
24
Guy Fawkes Night
25
DECEMBER 25
GLOSSARY
a carol (noun) = a Chrismas song
culture (noun) = behaviour and customs of a group of people
e.g. Tongan, Samoan
to decorate (verb) = to make beautiful, add pretty objects
mince (noun) = fruit chopped into small pieces and mixed with spices
a Nativity play (noun) = the story of the birth of Jesus
an ornament (noun) = an object that looks pretty and used
as a decoration
tinsel (noun) = a decoration made of thin pieces that
sparkle and glitter
Christmas Day is a public holiday held on the 25th December. It is a very special
day for Christians as they celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. Celebrations for
people living in New Zealand will be dierent depending on the culture, religion
or traditions of the family.
In the month of December, before Christmas Day, city streets and store windows are
decorated with lights and tinsel. People post Christmas cards to their family and friends.
Families will often buy a Christmas tree (a real or articial pine tree), place it inside their
home and decorate it with lights, ornaments and tinsel. Presents are bought for
family and friends, wrapped in coloured paper and ribbons and placed under the tree
or in a stocking ready to be opened on Christmas Day. For non-Christian families,
Santa Claus (also known as Father Christmas) is an important part of Christmas.
Children are told that Santa will visit their homes on Christmas Eve (the night of
the 24th December) climb down the chimney and place their presents under the
Christmas tree. He only delivers presents to nice, not naughty children. Many
children write a letter to Santa earlier in the year telling him they have been
good and asking for the toys and presents they would like this year. Christian
families will often go to church on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.
They will see a Nativity play and sing carols, songs or hymns, about the
birth of Jesus and the Christmas season. In New Zealand, as Christmas
occurs in Summer, many families celebrate the holiday at the beach.
A special Christmas meal is often part of the celebration. If the day
is spent at the beach people will have a picnic or BBQ.
Traditionally a meal at home will include ham, turkey, hot
vegetables, salads, Christmas pudding, mince pies and fruit
cake.
Christmas
26
BBQ/barbeque
church
stocking
carol
letter
wreath
beach
decorate (the tree)
store/shop
chimney
mince pie
birthday
ham
tinsel
Christmas/Santa Claus
Nativity play Ornament
candle card
ice-cream Jesus Christ
tree
turkey
Christmas lights
Christmas pudding
pavlova
present
26
Christmas
27
GLOSSARY
to encourage (verb) = to give support, help people along
leftover (noun) = something remaining after the rest has been used
poor (adjective) = having little or no money
a voucher (noun) = a form which lets you buy items in a store, use instead of money
wealthy (adjective) = having a lot of money, rich
worshippers (noun) = people who go to church and respect and honour God
Boxing Day is a public holiday held on the 26th December, the day
after Christmas Day. It occurs in most Commonwealth countries.
Traditionally, in the United Kingdom (U.K.) a Christmas box was
placed in every church on Christmas Day and worshippers placed
a gift inside the box. On the 26th December people
opened the Christmas box and gave what was inside to the
poor. This is why the day became known as Boxing Day. Wealthy
landowners would also “box up their leftover food and gifts and
give these out the day after Christmas to the people who lived and
worked on their land. Many poorly paid workers were required to
work on Christmas Day and took the following day o to visit their
families. As they prepared to leave, their employers would present
them with Christmas boxes.
Now on Boxing Day many stores have sales to encourage
customers to buy things they still have
in their shop after Christmas and to use their store vouchers they
may have been given for
Christmas presents.
DECEMBER 26
Boxing Day
28
after
rich/wealthy
encourage
box/Boxing
sale/discount
gift
Christmas
shop (noun)
leftover
church Commonwealth
shop (verb) voucher
money poor
28
Boxing Day
29
GLOSSARY
Eve (noun) = the day and evening before a special holiday
or event
Scottish (adjective) = comes from the country Scotland
to translate (verb) = to change words from one language
into another
New Years Eve or Old Years Night is celebrated on the evening of the 31st
of December. In New Zealand it is often celebrated with reworks and parties
with family and friends. Just before midnight people begin counting down the
seconds (“10, 9, … 3, 2, 1”). At 12:00 a.m. the start of the new year it is traditional
to shout “Happy New Year!” then hug and kiss your loved ones. The Scottish poem
Auld Lang Syne is often sung at this time and is translated as ‘for (the sake of) old
times’.
New Years Day begins on the 1st January at 12:00 a.m. and is the rst day of the year.
It is a public holiday in New Zealand and occurs in Summer. Many people spend the
day with family and friends at the beach or have a relaxed day at home.
On New Years Day the Honours List is published in the national newspaper. The
Honours List lists the names of special New Zealanders who have been given
awards by the Queen of England. Awards include The Order of New Zealand, The
New Zealand Order of Merit and The Queens Service Order.
DEC 31 - JAN 1
New Years Eve / New Year’s Day
30
BBQ/barbeque
second
newspaper
beach
song
park
fs– Eve
Summer
party
midnight/12:00 a.m.
music
translate
relax Scotland/Scottish
30
New Years Eve / New Year’s Day
31
END OF RAMADAN
GLOSSARY
a crescent (noun) = the shape of the moon in its rst and last phase
to fast (verb) = to avoid eating food
lunar (adjective) = related to the moon
a mosque (noun) = a Muslim temple, a place for people to worship
Eid al-Fitr is often shortened to Eid or Id. Eid is a
Muslim holiday which celebrates the end of Ramadan, the
holy month of fasting.
Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. The Islamic calendar
is a lunar calendar which means each month begins when the rst crescent
of a new moon can be seen.
During the month of Ramadan Muslims do not eat or drink during daylight
hours. Muslims will wake early, before it starts to get light, to eat their rst
meal of the day. After sunset everyone is ready to their evening meal. In
Muslim countries schools do not need a lunch break during Ramadan. The
children and teachers can go home much earlier.
On the morning of Eid Muslims will go to their mosques to pray. Children
might not go to school that day. On Eid, or the days following, Muslims
may visit one another or send special Eid cards to their family and friends.
Countries with large Muslim populations may have Eid festivals. Feasts are
held at mosques or community halls.
a Muslim (noun) = a person who follows the religion of Islam
a population (noun) = a number of people who live in a place or area
sunset (noun) = the time in the evening when the sun moves
down below the horizon
Eid-al-Fitr
32
calendar
shorten
fs– Eid
card
sunset
Mosque
fasting/Ramadan
crescent moon
Islamic/Muslim
drink eat
population
32
Eid-al-Fitr
33
Kelston Deaf Education Centre acknowledges permission given by the Deaf Studies Research Unit at Victoria University to adapt and
use the graphics found in the online version of the New Zealand Sign Language Dictionary.